Cavendish Barn Restoration Update – The Grand Finale!

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We recently completed the restoration and renovation of an historic timber frame from Cavendish, Vermont.

 

The project kicked off when we first visited the frame back in the winter of 2015. We’ve written about this barn frame before, while in the thick of the restoration process, and wanted to deliver the coda now that the project is complete.

The Background

The owners of the frame wanted to save a barn on their property; it was in bad shape and needed to be taken down before it collapsed. We first visited the barn in the winter, dismantled it in the spring, and spent the summer restoring it at the Green Mountain Timber Frames shop.

In late summer, we erected the restored frame on a new foundation.

The Transformation of a Barn

In the pictures below, you can see the entire process – from start to finish. From a wintery day in February when the sagging frame looked tired and in need of some TLC, to the beautiful great room it has become today.

Vermont timber frame in winter_Green Mountain Timber frames

Our first look at the Cavendish barn in Feb 2015

Dismantling historic timber frame barn

Spring prevails, and dismantling begins!

green mountain timber frames restoration process in cavendish vermont

A look at the last timbered wall section we took down. Once on sawhorses, we popped out each vintage peg, labeled every joint, and disassembled.

restoring post and beam structure

Restoration begins at the GMTF shop

The image below shows us adjusting the roof rafters to fit the new design of the great room. We pre-assembled the rafters, applied the original roof boards, carefully labeled each rafter and board, and then dismantled the roof before finally shipping the frame back to its home of origin.

restoring post and beam barn from 1850s

Restoration of new england barn from 1850s

Redesigned frame assembled on a new foundation about 100 yards from where it was first crafted nearly 200 years ago!

After the frame was firmly in place, another general contracting company  completed the project – The Severy Brothers  of Ludlow, VT. The next two pictures show how they used “SIPs” (structural insulated panels). The panels are fastened to the outside of the frame, which provides superb insulating value while showcasing all of the wooden elements on the interior. In the second picture, you can see the front entry taking shape.New barn home made from restored wood timber frame

Cavendish VT Barn frame with insulated panels

Exterior view of front entry with SIP panels

timber frame interior

The re-erected frame, pre fireplace. Note the beautiful ridge beam!

post and beam architecture in historic great room

The fireplace was created with stone found on the farm property

Barn door entryway to new england great room_green mountain timber frames.JPG

Sliding barn door into main house

restored timber frame home_green mountain timber frames

Large sliding doors capture the beautiful Vermont landscape

Exterior of Cavendish Barn Frame with front entry_Green Mountain Timber Frames

Timber porch entry into the great room

It was truly a pleasure to work on this barn frame. We love it when the opportunity arrises to restore a frame while keeping on its original location! Do you have an historic barn on your property that is in need of attention? We would love to see it!

 

Want to see some other projects we’ve done at Green Mountain Timber Frames?
Check out our completed timber frame projects!

Restoration of a Hand Hewn Pine Barn Frame, c. 1840

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Welcome to the heart of spring in Vermont!

Last week in Pomfret, Vermont, beneath a canopy of new leaves and apple blossoms, we tipped up another beautiful timber frame barn.  Below, you can see the barn as it originally stood in Benson, Vermont.

Old Barn home_Original LocationThis hand hewn frame, made of pine timbers, stood 21 feet wide x 30 feet long and was originally a meadow barn, built in the 1840s. We took it down a few years ago, restored the structure and erected it at our workshop. We used it to store materials until recently, when it was chosen to fit the needs of a new owner.

The goal of this barn restoration project is to erect the restored frame and finish the exterior and interior walls with seasoned barn boards. The owners want this “new” barn to look as if it has called the Pomfret site its home for at least 100 years.

It’s no easy task to restore a timber frame, but the work is exciting and rewarding. This past week, the crew of seven experienced timber framers made good progress each day, intent on creating “visual drama” for the new owner, and getting the job done.

Step 1: Dismantling the Old Frame

Here we are dismantling the previously restored frame to re-erect it in Pomfret.

Dismantling of timber frame barnOnce the frame was dismantled, we loaded it for transport to its new location in Pomfret.

Step 2: Re-erecting the Frame

3pm_historic timber frame from 19th century

We were able to put the 175 year old beams back together in our first day’s work.

Step 3: Putting up the Roof System

The next step was to put up the roof system and roof boards. Since this frame stands 25 feet tall, we had to install a temporary work platform to reach the roof peak.

green mountain timber frame vermont home construction
Setting up the roof system

From our safe perch on the temporary floor, we carefully set the roof rafters and applied the roof boards.

Timber frame barn home construction
Restored barn frame with roof boards applied

Step 4: Putting on the Red Roof!

The next step was to put on a recycled red roof. For this project, we took the roofing from another barn project we also have in progress.  I love it when we are able to salvage old wood or materials from one job and use them on another. One person’s trash is indeed another person’s treasure in my line of work.

Below is our third day of progress.

newly applied red roof historic wooden beamsRestored barn home with red roofStep 4: Applying Exterior Siding

On the fourth day of our efforts, we started applying the vintage siding. We’ll show the finished product in our next blog. Stay tuned!

Pomfret restored barn frame with siding———————–

Every dreamed of living in a centuries old barn? Want to save a piece of New England history? Let me know!  I’d love to hear from you!
— Dan McKeen

Winter Construction: Tales of a “Seasoned” Vermont Timber Framer

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This winter has not been an easy one here in New England, even for those of us who have lived in the cold north for many decades. It seems like each weekend has brought us a new snow storm, and Monday I woke up to this:

Thermometer on February 2015 Vermont Morning

Monday’s temp – Yes that middle reading is minus 25

Nonetheless, there are historic timber frames like this one in need of saving and the work continues, despite the bitter cold. This week, we are busy dismantling the Tinmouth timber frame. (That’s right – thanks to the help of my dedicated blog-fans, we were able to find a new owner and save the old barn home from demolition!) Historic Barn Home in Vermont winter While I’m not one to complain, the truth is that everything about winter work is either hard or less hard, never easy. But you can’t let ole man winter beat you down, so you beat your own body up and keep the project moving. Luckily – I’ve got a dedicated, hard working team on board to help with the work! timber framing team in vermont winter                                  A hearty crew, look very happy, huh! There’s no doubt about it – working as a group of hearty souls allows you to get through the day, even if we do dream of St. John V.I. this coming April and conjure up images of the beach as we toil! Timber Frame expert Dan Mckeen in St John Often 2 hours a day are spent removing snow to get at what you are working. Here we are clearing the roof on a Manchester, VT barn home.

removing snow from vermont timber frame home

The Snow Shovel Dance!

And this is a picture from a few years back, when we set a cupola in the midst of a snow squall… setting a cupola on a barn frame in winter Assembling wall sections in the snow is always an extra challenge. Timber frame restoration in Vermont winter This past week, when temperatures were stuck around the zero line (and below), my son in law and I stayed warm in my “toasty” 40 degree shop. (Yes, that’s Fahrenheit.) It’s simply too cold to be outside, so we carry each of the timbers inside to restore a wall section, one bent at a time.

Interior of Green Mountain Timber Frames Restored Frame

Restoring timbers in the shop

My workshop itself is a 1806 Baptist church that was turned into a potato storage barn in 1954. It’s very well insulated, for which I am grateful, so we are able to keep the barn restoration project moving forward.

Winter Timber Framing – The Bottom Line

Your toes freeze, your fingers hurt, you wonder why you chose Vermont of all places to settle…Because -25 is no joke and there is not much happy about these blood-freezing temps unless you are an ice fisherman. Those guys like to drive their trucks out to their ice shanties and huddle around a mini heater with plenty of ales for what ales ya.

Ice Shanty in Cold Vermont Winter

But there is an upside! While I work, a collection of tiny icicles form on my mustache, so I always have plenty of water to drink during the day! (Just have to chew it a bit…) Dan McKeen owner Green Mountain Timber Frames

Rare 1760s Gunstock Timber Frame Available – Your New Barn Home?

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I first wrote about this very early, hardwood timbered barn back in July and am pleased to announce that it is officially available for sale. This barn is a real gem and the right owner will appreciate living in such a unique piece of history. The post and beam barn is truly an extra fine example of “post medieval construction.” This kind of frame design is the same style that was used in building barns in the 1400s.

antique timber frame home new england

1760s gunstock timber frame

The vertical siding seen above is two layers thick. The barn frame was built using several kinds of wood, including beech, chestnut, pine, spruce and white oak.

Below, you can see an example of the antique wooden posts inside the frame. Note the gunstock posts which taper top to bottom. The posts are 9″x 9″ square at the base and then taper to 15″ x 9 ” at the top, where they meet intersecting timbers.

Gunstock post antique timber frame

Here is a view showing how straight the roof line is after 250 years and 7 tons of slate!
Vintage Barn Home 1760s

The potential barn home has elaborate, overbuilt wall and roof systems. The large beams indicate an early built frame.

5_Roof system is overbuilt

This picture shows the rugged construction of a gable (end) wall section:

Gable wall section of timber frame

Want to learn more about this beautiful piece of history? Contact us!

Consider turning this timber frame into your own barn home! This antique frame would make a beautiful barn home, carriage barn, studio or restored barn. To own this frame is to step back into medieval times!

Luke Larson
Luke@GreenMountainTimberFrames.com
Tel: 802.774.8972

The price for the restored frame includes erecting it on your foundation with roof boards applied. The siding boards are part of the package but would not be applied. The slate roof can be included, upon request.

240 Years Later – Antique Barn Has a New Home

Back in September, I wrote about this available old barn from Ira, Vermont that was awaiting a new owner with a vision for the next two centuries.

Ira Vermont old barn for sale - timber frame barn homesJust six months later, we are pleased to report that this handsome 1770s timber frame has been purchased. After a complete restoration, we will move the gunstock frame in the spring to its new home in northern Vermont.

Despite the mounting snowfall and frigid temperatures here in Vermont, the mucking out process is well under way. Generations of accumulated treasures/trash have been removed from the barn’s five bays. Four of us guys have put in 150 hours hauling out hay, farm implements, bed frames, furniture, metal, lumber ‘too short to save,’ and more!

Our intention is to have a clean interior to allow accurate measurements to be taken. This will enable the architect to make drawings of the current frame, followed by adjustments for the new owner’s dream.

100_4253

Hauling out hay.

In the second bay, underneath the hay, we discovered three horse drawn cultivators.

Horse drawn cultivators in old barn

Second bay – Horse drawn cultivators

The first bay is falling in. We have braced the timber frame to keep it from further sagging. Horse drawn equipment is stored in this bay, but cannot be removed at this time as it is frozen in the earth. In the mean time, we are being careful to protect it.

Findings in historic old barn

Semi-collapsed first bay.
          Horse drawn equipment.

Our next blog will share the story of why this barn did not burn down 85 years ago…

Stay tuned!

Hartford Modified Gunstock Barn

Recently, I left Vermont and drove over the border to New York. I wanted to take a closer look at a recently discovered barn. The barn is one in a group of five historic barns in West Hartford. You can see most of the barns on the Available Frames page of my Green Mountain Timber Frames website. 

The barn measures 22 x 32 ft. and is a “modified gunstock” frame. It has gunstock corner posts with drop girt mid posts. The pictures below help explain what this means.

The gunstock style of barn construction was popular before the 1820s. I would estimate that this beauty of a timber frame was built before the 1800s. It features chestnut timbers and the rafters are half-rounds.

When it comes time to restore this fine structure, we will replace the half-rounds with hand-hewn hardwood rafters salvaged from a late 1700s frame and transform it into a custom home, addition, studio or barn.

Here you can see the view from the front. 

Old Barns for Sale

Historic Barn for Sale

Below is the back of the barn. Note how the back side of this vintage barn isn’t painted – a classic Yankee tradition! I guess they were trying to save some money by only painting the side facing the road.

Old Timber Frame for Sale

Back View of Hartford Historic Barn

This picture shows the five-sided ridge beam. This style of architecture gives more structure to the roof system. Timber framers stopped using ridge beams after the 1840s. By eliminating them, I imagine it made the building process go more quickly.

Gunstock 5 sided ridge beam in timberframe

Five-sided Ridge Beam in Modified Gunstock Frame

The rear corner post below is a gunstock post  – it’s tapered like the gunstock of a rifle. The nearer post on the right is called a drop girt post – not tapered. (Please ignore the round timber). This is why I am calling it a “modified gunstock frame”.  It’s a mystery to me why they chose this combination of styles, using both gunstock and drop girt posts. Perhaps they were trying to simplify the joinery – timber joints.

Corner Post - Gunstock Frame - Old Barns for Sale

Corner Post of the Modified
Gunstock Timber Frame

Below are some more views of the interior:

Antique Timber frames for Sale with Chestnut Timbers

Chestnut Timbers in Vintage Barn Frame

Interior of 19th Century New England Timber Frame Barn

Interior of Timber Frame Barn

Please let me know if you are interested in visiting this timber frame gem or seeing the other antique timber frames for sale at Green Mountain Timber Frames –  we encourage visitors! These strong wooden beams would really make a beautiful home or business space.

If you would like to see this frame, or another available timber frame we have in stock, please contact Green Mountain Timber Frames!

Barn Raising – A good week’s work

We had a great time last week getting this vintage timber frame up in Manchester, Vermont. The post and bean frame with hand hewn wood was originally built around 1800, in Middle Granville, NY.

It was a beautiful week and we worked surrounded by the vibrant colors of near-peak foliage and under the watchful eye of Mount Equinox in the background. Thank God,  the weather was perfect!

Here are some pictures showing the highlights:

Manchester VT Raising - Beautifully restored timber frame beams

Beautifully restored timber frame beams

Saturday Restoring Historic Timber frame

Last Saturday’s work – restoring the frame and getting the primary timbers up

Saturday Timber Framing in Manchester VTAfter erecting the main timbers over the weekend, we spent last Monday focused on placing the roof rafters. We also pegged most joints in the frame with wooden trunnels.

Restoring Historic barn in Vermont

With help from a Grade All, and the view of Mount Equinox in the background.

Here we are installing the roof rafters.

Vermont Timber Framing with Mount Equinox in Background

Adding Roof Boards to Manchester Vermont Timber Frame

Adding roof boards to timber frame

Applying roof boards to Vintage Timber Frame

Adding tar paper over roof boards, as we installed the original boards.

Outhouse in Rural Vermont Best Part of Timber framing

An important part of setting up a timber framing work site: moving the outhouse – at arm’s length –  to the proper location.

Finishing Barn Restoration

The completed roof, protected by tar paper.